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Video observations at nests of the honey buzzard

Insights into a live in airy height: A paper published in the Corax journal by Fridtjof Ziesemer, Malte Schlüter and our colleague Thomas Grünkorn summarises the results of an observational study of honey buzzards at the nest.

In this study, two nests with two young each were observed using cameras until the young birds left the nest after about eight weeks. Aim of the study was to add to existing knowledge about behavioural patterns. Video footage and photographs allow for a detailed insight into a birds' life. In comparison to direct observations, relatively accurate analyses of the food spectrum or nighttime observations are possible based on especially video footage.

Cameras also allow for nighttime observations. Here, a female tries to scare off a nocturnal threat.

It was found for example that the young birds partly reacted aggressively or only reluctantly accepted the food when their parents returned to the nest with no or not their favourite food, i.e. wasp nests. In addition, the paper discusses further observations on the distribution of tasks between the male and female adults as well as nighttime behaviour.

The paper can be downloaded here.

The common buzzard is a further bird of prey species for which BioConsult SH carried out intense nest observations in a long-term project. Please refer to our project page for further information.