Header Slideshow Image 1 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 2 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 3 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 4 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 5 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 6 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 7 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 8 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 9 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 10 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 11 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 12 of 13
Header Slideshow Image 13 of 13

Project red kite SH

More than half of the world's red kite population breeds in Germany, which therefore bears a special responsibility for this strictly protected bird of prey species. However, the birds are repeatedly victims of poisoning.

In the "Project red kite SH", BioConsult SH and further project partners investigate the red kite population in a region of Schleswig-Holstein with a large number of poisoning incidents over the last years. The project has been commissioned by the State Agency for Agriculture, the Environment and Rural Areas (Landesamt für Landwirtschaft, Umwelt und ländliche Räume, LLUR).

Aims of the project are:

A nest camera was installed to observe the birds around the clock and nest guardians were trained. Tasks of guardians include checks of the nest (from a safe distance) to document the breeding success or identify disturbances.

This image from the nest camera shows two young birds in the nest, with a parent bird in the background.

Night visit from an eagle owl.

About 15,000 red kite pairs breed in Germany, 240 of these in Schleswig-Holstein in mainly the eastern and south-eastern parts.

Wild red kite can live as long as 25 years. Once a year the birds hatch one to four eggs. The clutch size depends on the availability of food. In years with many mice, females will lay more eggs. Incubation takes about 35 days. After hatching, the chicks will stay in the nest for between 45 and 60 days. Also the nestling time depends on the availability of food. Well nourished nestlings develop faster.

Further information on the project including video material of a nest camera as well as training material are available on the project page (in German).


Contact

Thomas Grünkorn

Stefan Wolff